COMPOUND SENTENCE EXAMPLES AND EXERCISES: ENHANCE YOUR SPEECH AND WRITING


Compound Sentence Examples

Do you want to infuse more details into your writing? Do it with compound sentences! We have prepared a comprehensive explanation along with compound sentence examples below.

Writing essays, sentences, and paragraphs requires the proper use of words and phrases. How you construct your sentences is one way to hook your readers on your story, report, news, or articles. You can do eye-catching or page-turning works with the help of creative sentences. 

Read on and find out how the compound sentence examples below can help you improve your speech and writing.

Compound Sentence Examples: What You Need to Know First compound sentence examples

First, let us review your knowledge with sentences. 

  • It is a set of words that contains a subject (the person or thing doing the action) and a predicate (tells us what the person or thing does or is).
  • In writing, it begins with a capital letter and ends with a period (.), question mark (?), and exclamation point (!).
  • It must express a complete thought, not fragmented (usually missing a subject or verb).

There are different types of sentences structurally, these are:

  • Simple
  • Compound
  • Complex
  • Compound-complex

A simple sentence is an independent clause (that can stand alone as a sentence) with no conjunction or dependent clause (it does not express a complete thought).

Example: I always wanted to become a writer.

A compound sentence is two independent clauses joined by punctuation and conjunctions.

Example: I always wanted to become a writer, and she wanted to become a doctor.

The sentence above has two independent clauses that combined by comma (,) and the conjunction (and)

A Complex sentence has more than one clause. One of them must be an independent clause. The other/others must be a dependent clause. There are also some connectors for the clauses of a complex sentence to be connected.

Example: I know that you always wanted to be a writer.

The sentence above has a dependent clause followed by a connector (that) and an independent clause.

A Compound-complex sentence contains at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause.

Example: I know that you always wanted to become a writer, but I always wanted to become a doctor.

The sentence above has one dependent clause followed by a complex connector (that) and two independent clauses with compound conjunction (but) between them.

Now, let us focus on COMPOUND SENTENCE EXAMPLES! compound sentence examples

  1. Compound sentences are two or more independent clauses.

Remember, independent clauses are sentences that can stand alone, or we can say that the compound sentences are two or more simple sentences combined.

Example: She completed her literature review, and she created her reference list.

The sentence above has two independent clauses or simple sentences.

  1. Compound sentences formed with a semicolon (;).

To replace a period to have a smooth transition between sentences, use a semicolon (;).

Example: Never pick a fight with an ugly person; they’ve got nothing to lose.

The sentence above has two independent clauses or simple sentences combined with a semicolon. 

  1. Compound sentences formed with a colon.

Think of a colon (:) as an equals sign (=). The information on the left of the colon equals the information on the right. But beware because the words after a colon are not often an independent clause.

Example: I know one thing: I love that girl.

Beware because some words after a colon are not often an independent clause. Note that there are two or more independent clauses that must combine.

  1. Compound sentences formed with a dash.

Dash is used to extend the sentence, to replace a colon that offers more information about something previously mentioned.

Example: I know you’re here — I can smell your perfume.

Like colon, beware because some words after a dash are not often an independent clause. Note that there are two or more independent clauses that must combine.

  1. Compound sentences formed with coordinating conjunctions.

There are only seven coordinating conjunctions. They are all short, one-syllable words:

For—And—Nor—But—Or—Yet—So — remember them with the mnemonic FANBOYS.

Let’s break it down!

For – He felt cold, for it was snowing.

We use the coordinator – for something like “because” to join two clauses when the second clause is the reason for the first clause.

And – I took a taxi, and she drove home.

The and conjunction is the most common conjunction. It has several uses.

  • The compound sentences above use “and” to join two clauses when the second clause happens after the first clause.
  • To join two clauses with equal value. For example, London is in England, and Rome is in Italy. 
  • To join two clauses when the second clause happens after the first clause. For example, There was a big bang, and the lights went out. 
  •  To join two clauses when the second clause is a result of the first clause. For example, I went to bed early, and the next day I felt better.

Nor – He did not want help, nor did she offer it.

We use “nor” to join two alternative clauses when the first clause uses a negative such as neither or never. 

But – I wanted to go late, but she wanted to go on time.

We use “but” to introduce a clause that contrasts with the preceding clause.

Or – She cooked dinner, or she went out to a restaurant.

We use “or” to join two alternative clauses.

Yet – She owned a car, yet she did not know how to drive it.

The “yet” conjunction is similar to but. It means something like but at the same time, nevertheless, but despite this. As with but, there is a contrast between the clauses.

So – She had to go, so she called a friend to drive her.

The “so” conjunction means something like, therefore, and for this reason.

The Rules for Comma

The use of the comma before the coordinating conjunction in the two independent clauses is not enough to form a compound sentence.

Examples:

Wrong – I was tired from working late, I had to go to class.

Correct – I was tired from working late; I had to go to class.

Correct – I was tired from working late, but I had to go to class.

When combining sentences into a compound sentence, you need a comma before the coordinating conjunction. 

When you use a coordinating conjunction, you may remove any subject word and modal auxiliary from the second clause.

Examples:

He’s already had three beers, and now he wants another one.

(Revised) He’s already had three beers and now wants another one.

You can take a train, or you can take a bus.

(Revised) You can take a train or take a bus.

  1. We can also join independent clauses with words and phrases like, moreover, however, at least(conjunctive adverbs). In this case, use a semicolon (;) and followed by a comma (,) before the conjunctive adverb.

Examples:

  • John loves Mary; however, Mary doesn’t love John.
  • Salad is not expensive; moreover, it’s very healthy.
  • What he did was incredible; in fact, I can hardly believe it.

Let’s Apply What We’ve Learnt!

Now, state whether the following compound sentence examples are correct or incorrect, based on the coordinating conjunctions, semicolon (;), colon (:).

Check your progress with the answers provided in the end.

  1. He was getting late he; hurried to the office.
  2. He is sick; therefore, he did not attend the meeting.
  3. She had to go to her hometown so she left a little early.
  4. He is a good student; therefore, he was also active in sports.
  5. She loved children; however, she had no time to play with them.
  6. She cooked dinner. He did the dishes.
  7. The tea is hot and it’s also raining outside.
  8. She was happy; therefore, she was singing.
  9. She stayed alone for she never felt lonely.
  10. He was nervous; therefore, he was not allowed to give the speech.

Answers:

  1. incorrect: He was getting late, so he hurried to the office.
  2. correct
  3. incorrect: She had to go to her hometown, so she left a little early.
  4. correct
  5. correct
  6. incorrect: She cooked dinner; he did the dishes.
  7. incorrect: The tea is hot, and it is also raining outside.
  8. correct
  9. incorrect: She stayed alone; yet, she never felt alone.
  10. correct

A Recap

A compound sentence is two or more independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction, a semicolon, colon, conjunctive adverb, with the proper use of a comma. So a compound sentence is like two or more simple sentences added together. It does not contain any dependent clauses.

 

Want some more hints and tips for learning English by yourself? Click here!

Worried about grammar mistakes in English? Check out our helpful advice!

Recent Posts